Tag Archives: Upper Peninsula

Spotlight Feature: Statistics of the Northern Tradition Blog!

For this blog post, I thought it might be interesting to let all of you know some of the statistics about our blog here, and how we have changed (or not?) over time. As it turns out, you all comprise a pretty diverse crowd of viewers.  To start off, here is a graph of all of our views for the past several weeks:

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Obviously this week isn’t done yet, and after our post today should get more views as is normal. We can view how many views we’ve got by the last 10 days, weekly, monthly, or annually.

Other interesting statistics we can look at include the total number of views per month since we began the blog back in 2012:

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So far, we’re on track to come out ahead of the total views for 2013, which was our “most popular” year. Last month (October) was our “most popular” month of 2017 so far, and our third-most viewed month since the blogs’ inception. To all of you that have been with us since 2012, or if this post is your first, we at the Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives appreciate you!

Additionally, we can look at which posts have been viewed the most. Here is a list of some of our most popular posts in the last year:

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My favorite statistic to look at is the country of origin of our viewers. Surprisingly, we have viewers from all over the globe, with people reading about our archives from every continent (except Antarctica)! See how the map continues to fill in as time progresses backwards. Countries highlighted in yellow or red have viewed our blog.

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Every country highlighted in color (yellow or red) has viewed our blog! As to be expected, most of you are from the Unites States, whereas many of you are abroad, which is pretty cool. In total, we have had viewers from 104 countries around the world!

For next week, we will be open during our normal times from Monday-Wednesday, and closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday. Have safe travels, enjoy your next week, and feel free to stop in the archives! Give us a call at 906-227-1225 or email us at archives@nmu.edu to let us help with your research needs.

(This post was written by Senior Student Assistant Stefan Nelson)

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Tsu Ming Han: Man of Two Different Worlds

Tsu Ming Han

Dr. Magnaghi and James Shefchik recently published a book that they had been working on for some time. Tsu Ming Han: Man of Two Different Worlds is the title, and it details the incredible life of Tsu-Ming Han. Here is the synopsis:

“Over the centuries the Upper Peninsula has grown and developed due to many immigrants who arrived. Some of their stories are known but most have been lost to time. One of these stories belongs to Tsu-Ming Han, a Chinese immigrant, a geologist and senior research laboratory scientist at Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company (now Cliffs Natural Resources). He came to the Upper Peninsula in the 1950s and was instrumental in the development of lower grade iron ore refinement processes and pelletization, which had a direct impact on the region and its people. In his spare time as a geologist, he identified an ancient fossil, Grypania Spiralis. Additionally important to the story was his family: Joy his wife and his children; Dennis, Timothy, and Lisa. This is another major effort of Northern Michigan University’s Center for Upper Peninsula Studies to shed new light and ideas on the history of the U.P.”

This little known U.P. star is finally getting his time to shine. For more information on Tsu-Ming Han, check out our former blog post about him. The finding aid for Tsu Ming Han’s papers is also online.

If you’re interested in reading the book, it is available on amazon, google books, and LuLu.com in an ebook format. The NMU archives also has the Tsu-Ming Han papers available. Come stop by to check them out!

Written by Grace Menter

Morgan Heights Tuberculosis Sanatorium

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Listed as the most haunted place in Marquette by Travel Marquette, the Morgan Heights Tuberculosis Sanatorium off of County Road 492 has certainly seen its fair share of deaths. The sanatorium first opened its doors in 1911 to tuberculosis patients that needed a clean and quiet place to—hopefully—recover.

Recently, the NMU Archives began processing the Morgan Heights patient records. We have found death records, personal letters, medical charts, and even records of births. We have also seen an unfortunate amount of death in these files. Many checked into Morgan Heights, but not many checked out again, at least in the early years.

In the mid-twentieth century, the sanatorium was shut down for not having the equipment or expertise to be up to code for that time. Unfortunately, all of the original buildings but the nurses’ quarters were torn down, and those have been turned into residential housing. The people that live on the old grounds say that they often see ghosts wandering around.

Patient files are available for patron use if the person has been dead for more than fifty years. For more information on HIPAA and other privacy laws, see our former post on the topic. Beyond patient files, there is also a series of Morgan Heights photographs available.

Please stop in and take a look if you’re interested! The Archives is open Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10 AM-5 PM and Tuesday/Thursday 10 AM-7 PM.

Source: http://www.travelmarquettemichigan.com/the-most-haunted-places-in-marquette/

Written by Grace Menter