Tag Archives: Upper Peninsula

Spotlight Feature: Statistics of the Northern Tradition Blog!

For this blog post, I thought it might be interesting to let all of you know some of the statistics about our blog here, and how we have changed (or not?) over time. As it turns out, you all comprise a pretty diverse crowd of viewers.  To start off, here is a graph of all of our views for the past several weeks:

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Obviously this week isn’t done yet, and after our post today should get more views as is normal. We can view how many views we’ve got by the last 10 days, weekly, monthly, or annually.

Other interesting statistics we can look at include the total number of views per month since we began the blog back in 2012:

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So far, we’re on track to come out ahead of the total views for 2013, which was our “most popular” year. Last month (October) was our “most popular” month of 2017 so far, and our third-most viewed month since the blogs’ inception. To all of you that have been with us since 2012, or if this post is your first, we at the Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives appreciate you!

Additionally, we can look at which posts have been viewed the most. Here is a list of some of our most popular posts in the last year:

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My favorite statistic to look at is the country of origin of our viewers. Surprisingly, we have viewers from all over the globe, with people reading about our archives from every continent (except Antarctica)! See how the map continues to fill in as time progresses backwards. Countries highlighted in yellow or red have viewed our blog.

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Every country highlighted in color (yellow or red) has viewed our blog! As to be expected, most of you are from the Unites States, whereas many of you are abroad, which is pretty cool. In total, we have had viewers from 104 countries around the world!

For next week, we will be open during our normal times from Monday-Wednesday, and closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday. Have safe travels, enjoy your next week, and feel free to stop in the archives! Give us a call at 906-227-1225 or email us at archives@nmu.edu to let us help with your research needs.

(This post was written by Senior Student Assistant Stefan Nelson)

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Tsu Ming Han: Man of Two Different Worlds

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Dr. Magnaghi and James Shefchik recently published a book that they had been working on for some time. Tsu Ming Han: Man of Two Different Worlds is the title, and it details the incredible life of Tsu-Ming Han. Here is the synopsis:

“Over the centuries the Upper Peninsula has grown and developed due to many immigrants who arrived. Some of their stories are known but most have been lost to time. One of these stories belongs to Tsu-Ming Han, a Chinese immigrant, a geologist and senior research laboratory scientist at Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company (now Cliffs Natural Resources). He came to the Upper Peninsula in the 1950s and was instrumental in the development of lower grade iron ore refinement processes and pelletization, which had a direct impact on the region and its people. In his spare time as a geologist, he identified an ancient fossil, Grypania Spiralis. Additionally important to the story was his family: Joy his wife and his children; Dennis, Timothy, and Lisa. This is another major effort of Northern Michigan University’s Center for Upper Peninsula Studies to shed new light and ideas on the history of the U.P.”

This little known U.P. star is finally getting his time to shine. For more information on Tsu-Ming Han, check out our former blog post about him. The finding aid for Tsu Ming Han’s papers is also online.

If you’re interested in reading the book, it is available on amazon, google books, and LuLu.com in an ebook format. The NMU archives also has the Tsu-Ming Han papers available. Come stop by to check them out!

Written by Grace Menter

Morgan Heights Tuberculosis Sanatorium

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Listed as the most haunted place in Marquette by Travel Marquette, the Morgan Heights Tuberculosis Sanatorium off of County Road 492 has certainly seen its fair share of deaths. The sanatorium first opened its doors in 1911 to tuberculosis patients that needed a clean and quiet place to—hopefully—recover.

Recently, the NMU Archives began processing the Morgan Heights patient records. We have found death records, personal letters, medical charts, and even records of births. We have also seen an unfortunate amount of death in these files. Many checked into Morgan Heights, but not many checked out again, at least in the early years.

In the mid-twentieth century, the sanatorium was shut down for not having the equipment or expertise to be up to code for that time. Unfortunately, all of the original buildings but the nurses’ quarters were torn down, and those have been turned into residential housing. The people that live on the old grounds say that they often see ghosts wandering around.

Patient files are available for patron use if the person has been dead for more than fifty years. For more information on HIPAA and other privacy laws, see our former post on the topic. Beyond patient files, there is also a series of Morgan Heights photographs available.

Please stop in and take a look if you’re interested! The Archives is open Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10 AM-5 PM and Tuesday/Thursday 10 AM-7 PM.

Source: http://www.travelmarquettemichigan.com/the-most-haunted-places-in-marquette/

Written by Grace Menter

 

The Grace H. Magnaghi Visiting Research Grant: Apply by March 10!

It’s that time of year again! The Archives is accepting applications for the Grace H. Magnaghi Visiting Research Grant. We have previously discussed who Grace Magnaghi was on this blog, but today we thought that we would give a brief overview of how to apply for the grant.

The grant is designed to help scholars pay for their travel costs to the archives to do scholarly research using archives collections or library special collections that will aid in the production of a thesis, dissertation, journal article, research paper, or other publication related to the history of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Previous recipients have researched topics such as Julia Tibbett’s battle to save Presque Isle from development, the history of Coalwood (a Cleveland Cliffs Iron Mining Company-owned lumber camp), Frederic Baraga, and an Episcopal bishop found guilty of embezzlement in the 1930s. An overview of our collections can be found here, and a list of general topics that the archives collects can be found here. Please note that only fully processed collections appear on the search page. If you are interested in what unprocessed collections we might have that would be relevant to your research interests, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Applicants must submit an application form, a resume or CV, and two letters of recommendation. If accepted for the grant, the recipient will write a one page report of their activity in the archives/library plus their receipt for expenses and will give a copy of the result of their research to the archives. In addition, they will return to the archives at some later date to give a presentation on their research. We welcome applications from non-history fields. Previous recipients have included anthropologists and environmental scientists.

 

This year, applications for the program are due on March 10. You can find application forms and instructions here. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us at archives@nmu.edu.

Written by Annika Peterson

Collection Spotlight: Barbeau and Scranton Shipping Records

Today we thought that we would highlight one of our recently processed collections: the Barbeau and Scranton shipping records. The Barbeau and Scranton company moved goods from Detroit to the Upper Peninsula from the 1820s to about 1910. The collection spans this entire range, although the bulk of the documents date from the 1850s and 1860s.

The collection contains correspondence, financial documents, legal documents, newletters, deeds, insurance documents, ship manifests, shippers, and boat inspections. Of particular interest to researchers are the individual orders and requests from traders, Native Americans, and early white settlers of the Upper Peninsula. The collection serves as an (incomplete) documentation of the goods imported into the Upper Peninsula during the 19th century.

Those interested in the company might also want to explore the Barbeau and Scranton letters possessed by the Marquette County Historical Society, the Barbeau papers at the Bayliss Public Library,  and the Peter Barbeau papers at the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan.

Interested in the Barbeau and Scranton collection? Come and check it out at the archives! We are open Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10 AM-5 PM and Tuesday/Thursday 10 AM-7 PM.

Written by Annika Peterson

Collection Spotlight: Postcard Collection

This week we would like to highlight our collection of postcards from Northern, Marquette, and the UP. The postcards date from as early as the turn of the century and contain some fascinating scenes. Many also have messages written on them. Below are some of our favorites:

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An image from Calumet, MI of a tunnel leading to a store, year unknown.

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A sculpture of snow and ice made in Marquette, MI in the 1940s.

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The view up Front Street in 1909 with a message from travellers in the UP on the back.

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An image of Washington Street from around 1909 with a message from a Northern student to a friend or relative in Ontonagon.

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A postcard depicting Northern State Normal, ca. 1900-1930.

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A postcard advertisement for Northern’s summer session, ca. 1923.

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A postcard from 1907 depicting Northern.

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A postcard from the early 1920s depicting Northern’s bizarre Elementary Swedish Exercises class.

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Northern’s bowling alley, year unknown. The bowling alley was where the bookstore is now.

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An image advertising the Upper Peninsula, year unknown.

Come in and check out the rest of the postcard collection! Our schedule for the winter semester is Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10 AM-5 PM and Tuesday/Thursday 10 AM-7 PM.

Written by Annika Peterson

Evening at the Archives: Italian American Immigration in the Upper Peninsula

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This past Tuesday, we held our bi-annual Evening at the Archives event. Senior history major Austin Bannister gave a fascinating presentation about Italian American immigration in the Upper Peninsula in the early twentieth century. His research was part of his HS 390 project, a class required of all history majors in which they must do a research project at the archives.

He discussed general trends of immigration to the United States in the early twentieth century. Many Italians, he said, came here only temporarily to work in the mines and later returned home. Others frequently went back and forth between the US and Italy. Some remained here and even arranged marriages. Mining conditions and fraternal organizations created by the miners were also discussed.

Interested in this topic? Want to do some research yourself? Here are useful resources at the archives:

  • Italian American Oral History Collection: This incredibly helpful resource consists of hundreds of oral history interviews conducted by Dr. Russell Magnaghi and others.
  • Marquette County Articles of Incorporation: As mentioned above, Italian immigrants created fraternal organizations to help support each other in times of need. Many of these organization registered their bylaws and other materials with the county.
  • Marquette County Naturalization Records: The naturalization records document how many Italians (and other nationalities) were becoming citizens, where they were from, what their job was, if they were married or had children, etc. They can be quite important for researchers.
  • Russell Magnaghi papers: Besides creating the Italian American oral history collection, Dr. Magnaghi has done much research into Italian Americans (and many other topics!). His papers document his research and can be extremely helpful to researchers seeking sources.
  • Il Minatore: A few issues of an Italian language newspaper from the UP
  • Many other regional newspapers: While time-consuming, looking through newspapers can yield fantastic results!

Come into the Archives and check out these and other collections today! Please note that we will be closed Wednesday-Friday of next week for Thanksgiving.

Written by Annika Peterson