Tag Archives: NMU

Feature Spotlight: Mending

One of lesser known functions we perform at the Archives is the process of library book mending. Beginning winter semester, 2017, the book mending duties moved from the Library to the Archives. Archives student assistant collectively spend 10 hours each week mending damaged or worn out books from the Library’s collection. You might ask, “what does book mending entail?” In short, mending consists of repairing various torn, worn, or busted parts of books.

A typical mending slip identifies common problems with the book. In this example, the book has a worn spine that will require spine tape to be glued on to protect the spine from further damage. Other common mending actions include taping rips in pages, erasing pencil markings, reconnecting separated hinges, etc. Archives student assistant, Lydia Henning, reviews a mending slip at the start of her shift at the book mending workstation. Generally, each Archives student assistant conducts book mending duties in two-hour blocks.

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When the text block of a book has broken away from the inside of the cover hinge, a common fix to use is the “Unibind” machine shown below. Basically, it provides a moderate heat for the book to sit on (spine down) to melt the special glue applied to reconnect the back of the text block to the spine hinge. The glue (opaque yellow strips) is also shown below in the bin, and is a cut to size for each book required.

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For thin softcover books or books without many pages, plastic sheeting binders are used to hold the books together better and protect the spine from getting too hot.

When a book is “done” and has been mended, it’s reviewed by Glenda Ward, Archives / Library Senior Clerk. Assuming all mending efforts have been completed correctly, books are then carted back up to the Library and put back on the shelves.

Please feel free to stop by the Archives (LRC Room 126) for your research needs, for a quiet place to study, or just to say “hi” and see what we’re all about. Our hours are 10am-5pm on Monday’s, Wednesday’s, and Friday’s; and from 10am-7pm on Tuesday’s and Thursday’s.

(This post was written by Stefan Nelson, Senior Archives Student Assistant, a.k.a “Number One”)

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Historical Spotlight: Evolution and Name Updates of NMU

I worked this summer sorting through old undigitized historical photographic negatives about the University.  I came across this photo and loved the simple story and message:

In the beginning, we weren’t a university- we were Northern State Normal in 1899. In 1927, we became Northern State Teachers College. We then turned to Northern Michigan College of Education in 1942. Second-to-lastly, some of our alumni might have gone to our school and known it by this name: Northern Michigan College, or NMC. In the late 1950s, construction of the Mackinac Bridge was completed.

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In March 1963, NMC became NMU. This blog poster (me) believes that the bridge uniting the two peninsulas of Michigan lead to an increase of people living in the lower peninsula taking interest in and attending the College. Thus, the size of the college got big enough to permit another name change. Which brings us to the name currently held: Northern Michigan University.

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Also! A bit on an interesting recent campus events: This past Friday (September 8th) was the  Sonderegger Symposium Friday, which annually highlights the Upper Peninsula’s history! It is free of charge. This years’ Symposium included scholarly presentations about the UP’s life and culture, where lunch and refreshments were provided throughout the day. We hope all who attended enjoyed! We apologize for the slight delay in the publishing of the blog post, the next one will be on schedule this upcoming Friday September 15th.

(This post was written by Lydia Henning)

Collection Spotlight: Local 1477 Superior Grange Patrons of Husbandry Records

The Superior Grange local no. 1477 Patrons of Husbandry was an agricultural group located in Sands Township in the Upper Peninsula. However, the Superior Grange of the U.P. is but one unit in a larger organization called the National Grange. Founded in 1867, “The Grange is a family, community organization with its roots in agriculture,” according to the National Grange website. The Patrons of Husbandry were, historically speaking, farmers and their families who were involved in their community in order to improve life for everyone. However, the Superior Grange wasn’t always as accepting as they would paint themselves.

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Record types we have in this collection include song books, bylaws, correspondence, junior patron manuals, catalogs, membership applications, and member rosters. It can be found on our online database Archives Space under M17-32.20170901_115538

To find out more, come visit the Central Upper Peninsula Archives, located in room 126 of the Learning Resources Center on NMU’s Campus. The Archives has the Superior Grange’s records in house should anyone come calling. Feel free to contact us at archives@nmu.edu or give us a call at 906-227-1225.

This post was written by Grace Menter

Collection Spotlight: History of the U.P. Radio Talks

This upcoming week, the Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives spotlight collection is the History of the U.P. Radio Talks, which is a collection of radio discussions from Russell M. Magnaghi from 2004. This collection consists of 44 different discussions that cover a wide range of U.P. history topics, ranging from the roaring 20’s and the effects of the Great Depression on the U.P., to the Upper Peninsula National Parks, and even an examination of the history of weird U.P. weather facts!

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Russell M. Magnaghi, the author of a Sense of Time: The Encyclopedia of Northern Michigan University and director of the Center for U.P. Studies (1999), provides a detailed and fascinating insight into various aspect of U.P. and NMU history. We have several copies of this book at the Archives, and it definitely can be a big help for researching many things. It’s organized alphabetically by subject and covers topics at NMU from 1899-1999.

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This collection is being digitized now and will soon be ready for the public to access. As a reminder, our summer hours are Monday through Friday, 10am-5pm. We look forward to seeing you soon!

(This blog post was written by Libby Serra)

Location Spotlight: The Archives

Hello everybody! Our apologies for not posting anything new in some time. Work this summer at the archives has been busy as usual, which is compounded because half of our student assistants who work here during the schoolyear are pursuing other summer employment. Anyways, this blogpost acts as both a reminder (to our regulars), and new information (to our newcomers) where the archives is, and where to park when visiting us.

For visitors not familiar with NMU’s campus, it can be hard finding the Central UP and NMU Archives. If you are wondering how to get to the Central UP and NMU Archives, be on the lookout for some new updates on our website. In the meantime, you can look at this blog post consisting of helpful links from NMU. Enjoy your scholarly research and investigations!

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Interactive Google Map of NMU:  http://www.nmu.edu/campusmap

Directions to NMU:  http://www.nmu.edu/admissions/node/122

Map of Campus: http://www.nmu.edu/sites/default/files/UserFiles/Pictures/Maps/NEWMAP_webquality.pdf

Parking Map: http://www.nmu.edu/publicsafety/node/229

Visitors to the archives can park in Lot 11, the Commuter/Faculty & Staff lot between Magers Hall dorms and the LRC. From there, you can walk up the hill and into the first level of our LRC. The archives is down the wide hall, and then to the left. You may also park in Lot 28, the smaller parking lot in back of Jamrich (where one can use parking meters). If parking in Lot 28, you may enter the LRC through the Jamrich tunnel and take the elevator or the stairs downstairs to the first level of the LRC, where the archives is.

(This post was written by Lydia Henning)

OUR GLAM-GLORIOUS GRADUATES

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This semester the Archives will be seeing three of our dedicated student assistants graduate and venture forth into the world of Get-A-Real-Job-Already-You-Have-A-Degree Land and we will miss them more than even they can imagine.  In honor and recognition of all they have accomplished and all they will accomplish we have designed a three-part blog series in order to share their greatness with all of you.  I have the pleasure of leading off with our Web Design Specialist, Kelley Kanon.

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kelley1Kelley came to NMU after graduating from the Grand Blanc Community High School; here she is receiving her high school diploma in 2012.  Kelley shares a story behind her decision to attend NMU and says it is a hilarious one that she loves to tell.  Tell us that story Kelley!  “I was a senior in high school before I started seriously looking into where I’d like to attend college. Living downstate, I knew about Central Michigan University, Western, and Eastern among other schools. Loving snow as much as I do, I wondered one day so do we even have a Northern Michigan University? One Google search later, I was so excited. Not only was this school in the UP, but Art and Design was a very popular major! Immediately we booked a campus visit. My parents and I loved the town and the school, and Northern ended up being the only school I even applied to.”

Memories are a part of who we all are and go with us throughout our lives.  Kelley shares one of those special memories and a picture from the 2015 Alpha Gamma Delta International Reunion Day with sisters Jonie and Morgan.  kelley2“I have millions of great memories here. I love this school and this town, yet without a doubt, the greatest part about being here has been all the people I’ve met. I’m so thankful for the friendships I’ve made. I’m also very thankful that I got myself involved in Greek life when I was a freshman. I could go on at length about how much growth I have seen myself go through after joining Alpha Gamma Delta, and additionally, I could not be more grateful to have had these sisters through these years as the greatest source of comfort and support. The family I have had here has been what made every experience at Northern a great one.”

kelley3The Archives has benefited immensely from having Kelley as part of our family and her contributions will live long after she leaves us; hopefully we contributed something to her as well.  “Working at the Archives has been crucial in helping me decide where I wanted to go with my career. My first two years of studying graphic design were phenomenal in that our projects were varied: I created magazine spreads, posters, websites, packaging, and books; however, with so many options, I was having trouble narrowing down what exactly it was that I was most interested in, and what I would be the most satisfied doing for a living. When I applied for this job at the Archives my junior year, I thought web design was my biggest interest. Having the opportunity to explore web design in a very real way confirmed it. While working here, I’ve been able to create websites from budding idea to completion, with always interesting subject matter!”

So, what is ahead for our fabulous web designer, you ask.  Well, she does have a plan!  “To be honest, I am embracing the impending identity crisis. I have been a student for my entire life, so taking this final step is equally exciting and completely terrifying. My short and long term goal both is to always be satisfied with what I am doing. I am looking into job opportunities that will make me feel like I am doing something important: that I will be happy to create for. I would love to work for a graphic design firm, for a car company, a video game company, or even to freelance and work for myself. My options are very open-ended at this time, but most immediately, I will be moving back home to the Flint, MI area to be with my very wonderful and supportive family while I search for jobs with a reasonable commute.”kelley4

Kelley Kanon
BFA Art & Design: Graphic Communication
April 2016

Northern Michigan University Archives Update

untitled-17A lot of things are going to be happening at the Archives this semester. Here’s an update about what’s going on:

New Online Exhibit

You may remember us announcing several months ago an upcoming online exhibit about student protests at Northern in the late 1960s. Well, a few complications pushed back the release date, but it should be going up within a week!

The site has multiple layers to explore. You can read a summary of the events or dive deeper into the sources themselves. We have digitized many sources including newspaper articles, photos, other documents, oral histories, and even some audio recorded at the protests themselves!

The idea first developed last March and research started in May. As one of the people involved with the project as a researcher and writer, I can tell you that we’re very excited to finally be able to share this project with you! Many thanks to the amazing Kelley Kanon an Anne Krohn who have been working very hard to digitize the sources and code and design the website and who have dealt with many delays and revisions!

Digitization and Transcription Project

The state of our oral history collections is currently widely varied. Some were donated with notes or transcripts, some were not. Sometimes those notes are mere topics, sometimes they are descriptions or summaries. In general, those interviews which were donated without transcripts or notes still don’t have them. This limits their accessibility for patrons, and makes it difficult for researchers to find potentially very helpful interviews.

However, even creating notes for a single interview, let alone transcribing it, is a very time-consuming process. The sheer number of oral histories and other audio and video records that we have makes digitization difficult as well. Hence, making these records more accessible has been put on the back burner for a very long time.

James Shefchik and Emily Winnell from the Center for Upper Peninsula Studies are helping us to change that. They are going to go through about five hundred oral history interviews and create a basic summary of what is on the tape. They are also going to develop a ranking for the importance of getting the interviews transcribed and digitized. The long-term goal is to make all of our oral history interviews and other audio records available online with basic notes or transcriptions.

NMU Video Collection

Our video records have been in similar disarray, but in the next few months they are finally going to be properly accessioned by Anne Krohn and Jessica Ulrich, which will make them much more accessible!

Comprehensive Records Survey

The Comprehensive Records Survey of all university records has finally begun and is running smoothly, although it’s keeping our records center team of Morgan Paavola, Prince Parker, and Stefan Nelson very busy. The offices that we have worked with so far are responding well and have been very helpful.

New Collection, Books, and Shelves

Dr. Magnaghi has kindly donated more of his papers to us along with many boxes of books about Michigan and the Upper Peninsula and six bookshelves. The many carts of boxes arrived today and accessioning will begin in the near future.

Upcoming Events at the Archives

Look for announcements about two Evening at the Archives events this semester! As details about time and date are confirmed, we will be releasing that information here and on social media.

On April 10, the Marquette County Genealogical Society will be hosting a genealogy lock-in at Peter White Public Library. We will be there with a display about genealogical resources at the Archives, so come and say hi to us! Space is limited at the lock-in, so be sure to register quickly after registration open if you want to go!

Written by Annika Peterson