Monthly Archives: November 2017

Spotlight Feature: Statistics of the Northern Tradition Blog!

For this blog post, I thought it might be interesting to let all of you know some of the statistics about our blog here, and how we have changed (or not?) over time. As it turns out, you all comprise a pretty diverse crowd of viewers.  To start off, here is a graph of all of our views for the past several weeks:


Obviously this week isn’t done yet, and after our post today should get more views as is normal. We can view how many views we’ve got by the last 10 days, weekly, monthly, or annually.

Other interesting statistics we can look at include the total number of views per month since we began the blog back in 2012:


So far, we’re on track to come out ahead of the total views for 2013, which was our “most popular” year. Last month (October) was our “most popular” month of 2017 so far, and our third-most viewed month since the blogs’ inception. To all of you that have been with us since 2012, or if this post is your first, we at the Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives appreciate you!

Additionally, we can look at which posts have been viewed the most. Here is a list of some of our most popular posts in the last year:


My favorite statistic to look at is the country of origin of our viewers. Surprisingly, we have viewers from all over the globe, with people reading about our archives from every continent (except Antarctica)! See how the map continues to fill in as time progresses backwards. Countries highlighted in yellow or red have viewed our blog.




Every country highlighted in color (yellow or red) has viewed our blog! As to be expected, most of you are from the Unites States, whereas many of you are abroad, which is pretty cool. In total, we have had viewers from 104 countries around the world!

For next week, we will be open during our normal times from Monday-Wednesday, and closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday. Have safe travels, enjoy your next week, and feel free to stop in the archives! Give us a call at 906-227-1225 or email us at to let us help with your research needs.

(This post was written by Senior Student Assistant Stefan Nelson)


Person Spotlight: Norman “Boots” Kakuk

Norman “Boots” Kukuk grew up here in Marquette, Michigan. Growing up, he always had a penchant for sports, especially hockey. In his four years at Northern State Teachers College, Boots earned three varsity letters for football and track and field, while continuing to play hockey for the Marquette Sentinels and maintaining his grades. He held the record for pole vault until 1939 and also earned a gold track shoe for javelin in 1940. In 1939, Boots was recommended to try out for the United States Olympic Hockey Team, but the start of World War II the following year put an end to those hopes. Interestingly, family lore claims that Adolf Hitler actually invited Boots to play hockey against the German team, but Boots’ father destroyed the letter the day he got it.

Upon graduation from Northern State Teachers College, Marquette public schools employed Boots as an Industrial Arts teacher and as a track and football coach. In 1941, Boots considered trying out for the Chicago Blackhawks or the Cleveland Barons Professional Hockey Clubs but was drafted into the army. He entered the U.S. Navy’s flight program on November 24, 1941. Boots was awarded the Navy-Marine Corps Heroism Medal in August of 1944. He also earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses and six Air Medals during his time in the Navy.


After the War, Boots returned to Marquette and became the Director of Recreation for the City of Marquette. He accomplished a great many things during his time as director, such as installing the first artificial ice plant in the Palestra, the indoor community ice rink. In addition, Boots managed all of the city’s recreational programs, such as sporting events and festivals. Despite all this work, Boots still found the time to play hockey with the Marquette Sentinels for several more years before finally retiring his jersey.


Sand being laid down on the floor in the making of the ice rink in the Palestra.


Getting ready for the Annual Ice Carnival.


Hockey Team on ice rink, year unknown.

If you’d like to learn more about Norman “Boots” Kakuk or our other collections, come on in to the Archives, give us a call (906-227-1225) or send us an email ( and we’ll be happy to help you!

(This post was written by Grace Menter)

Day in the Life Spotlight: The Film Projector Cont.

Continuing with our past blog post’s theme of a Day in the Life Spotlight, I’d like to build on the continuing saga of the Film Reel Projector.

It was a cold week in October. I was given the task of training our new digitization assistant on setting up the Film Reel Projector, like so many digitization student workers before me. I had a feeling I’d met this “Reel Projector” before… But upon seeing it, without mental preparation, I became lost in the procedural nuances (cords swept deep under desks; parts put away, out of sight). This Projector setup procedure had been cracked before, but our initial figuring out of how to set it up was a real brainteaser! Like Kyleigh said two weeks ago, it took at least 45 minutes.

Here’s a haiku about the experience-

Projector’s Corner

Wires tangle up in my head

Can’t connect nada

We got it to run, but we still didn’t get it to connect to our computer and record through that. So we were back figuring it out again Friday the week after and finally we figured it out.


Discovered new cord

Hmm is this the place for thing?

Victory, at LAST

So all’s well. Now, we have a new task at hand. One which we will enthusiastically take up for the sake of future Digitization student workers. Justice will be served to Projector (AKA we’ll be writing up more detailed instructions).

(This post was written by Lydia Henning)